Justice4Joey.co.uk
Justice4Joey.co.uk

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION


I was assured by several Home Secretary's and Home Office ministers that should Oldfield commit another crime with a blade he would be lifed off, so why is his liberty still being given when Crown Court Judges are deeming him to be Dangerous? 

 

I was told in a letter dated 04 June 2001 (one year to the day my brother died,)  By Lord Bassam on behalf of Charles Clarke the then Home Secretary

 

"The Crime Sentences Act 1997 introduced provisions requiring that those convicted of a second serious violent or sexual offence should receive an automatic life sentence, and be kept in prison for as long as it is considered that they would pose a serious risk to the public if released on licence.  The offences included in this provision themselves carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.  The likely reason why Mr Oldfield was not given an automatic life sentence is that any previous offences that he was convicted of was not a qualifying offence for the purpose of this section."

 

 So my argument now is - Oldfield has twice since killing my brother been convicted of using a blade and carrying one while on licence, the Judge at Leeds Crown Court deemed him as dangerous, why has he still not received a life sentence?  Does he really have to kill again before that will be classed as a serious enough offence?

 

 

SPEECHES REGARDING CPS & POLICE IN BLACKPOOL IN PARLIAMENT.

I thank my right hon. Friend for that reply and express my thanks for all the work that my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State and his team are doing to support victims, including the doubling of funding forVictim Support and the promised victims charter of rights, to which we look forward eagerly.

Nevertheless, from my experience, having taken up cases for victims of crime in Blackpool and held consultations on the subject, there are still problems with co-ordination of information between the CPS and the police. In particular, can I press him to consider the lack of continuity that is sometimes evident between investigating officers, those who make arrests and those who attend the court? It seems to me and to many people to whom I have spoken in Blackpool that that often causes problems in terms of relaying information.

Mr Gordon Marsden (Blackpool South, Labour)

Mr Gordon Marsden (Blackpool South, Labour)